Turquoise and Anasazi Pot Shard Necklace
Turquoise and Anasazi Pot Shard Necklace
Turquoise and Anasazi Pot Shard Necklace
Turquoise and Anasazi Pot Shard Necklace
Turquoise and Anasazi Pot Shard Necklace
Turquoise and Anasazi Pot Shard Necklace
Turquoise and Anasazi Pot Shard Necklace
Turquoise and Anasazi Pot Shard Necklace
Turquoise and Anasazi Pot Shard Necklace

Turquoise and Anasazi Pot Shard Necklace

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 Anasazi pottery necklace with sterling silver and genuine turquoise sliver beads. An authentic centuries-old Anasazi pot shard is the star of this one-of-a-kind necklace. Securely held in a prong setting to a 1" domed sterling silver square with a 2" twisted bail, the pot shard itself measures approximately .75" in diameter. Once part of a pot that was probably used for ceremonial occasions, the black and white coloration is recognized to be the earliest style. Flanked on either side by gorgeous green turquoise sliver beads, twisted sterling silver wire beads and handpainted native american beads that attach to a handmade, hammered copper ring. Soft and supple deerskin leather forms the remainder of the necklace with an adjustable leather single knot closure.

Length:  26" with leather slide for adjustment 

The Ancestral Puebloans, sometimes referred to as Anasazi (Navajo for ‘enemy ancestors’), were an ancient Native American culture that settled the present-day Four Corners region of the US;  southeastern Utah, northeastern Arizona, northwestern New Mexico and southwestern Colorado. They lived here for more than 1,000 years and then - within a single generation - they were gone. Why the Ancestral Puebloans abruptly left their established homes in the 12th and 13th centuries is not clear although climate change, prolonged periods of drought, environmental degradation, deforestation, hostility from new arrivals, religious or cultural change, and influence from other cultures are all supported by archaeological evidence. Most modern Pueblo peoples assert the Ancestral Puebloans did not "vanish", as is commonly portrayed in media presentations or popular books. They say that the people migrated to areas in the southwest with more favorable rainfall and dependable streams and merged into the various Pueblo peoples whose descendants still live in Arizona and New Mexico.

 Chaco Canyon and Mesa Verde are probably the most well known sites however many former dwellings are located on private land. These Ancestral Puebloans left behind spectacular cliff dwellings, fascinating wall art and exquisite pottery. The earliest pottery had black designs on white or light gray backgrounds, later evolving into reddish brown ware in the 13th century.

 This sterling silver and turquoise necklace showcases a pot shard of incredible antiquity that in all probability is upwards of 1,000 years old.

We recommend storage in an individual box to protect the delicate fragment.